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MathGroup Archive 1998

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RE: Recommended books for Mathematica

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg14391] RE: [mg14375] Recommended books for Mathematica
  • From: "Ersek, Ted R" <ErsekTR at navair.navy.mil>
  • Date: Sun, 18 Oct 1998 15:09:57 -0400
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

christopher edmonds wrote:
>
>I was wondering if there are any 
>"essential" Mathematica texts, 
>that are both good tutorials 
>and good references.
>
>
The Mathematica Book is a must have item.  The size may be intimidating, but
it's not so bad if you skip the parts that are of no interest to you.  Few
(if any) sections of the book require that you read a lot of the earlier
material first.  Also note the entire book is included in the online help so
you may not need the hard copy.

If you want to work with continuous Fourier Transforms the Wolfram
Research book on Standard Packages is a must have item, but that is
also included online.  Warning: to use the EE convention for the
transform you will have to change the default setting for the options
FourierOverallConstant and FourierFrequencyConstant.

Both of the above are very good tutorials, and references.  Besides that
there are a number of tutorials available, but I haven't relied them.

If You want to get deep into Mathematica Programming I highly recommend
the Power Programming book by D. Wagner, and Programming in Mathematica
(3rd ed.) by R. Meader.

Cheers,
Ted Ersek



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