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MathGroup Archive 1999

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Re: Limit of an Integer Function

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg18822] Re: Limit of an Integer Function
  • From: "Alex Scheitlin" <alex-s at worldnet.att.net>
  • Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 08:19:35 -0400
  • Organization: AT&T WorldNet Services
  • References: <7n12ad$bcq@smc.vnet.net>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

Seems like an idiotic way to do it but

Sum[Sin[n \[Pi]] - Sin[(n - 1)\[Pi]], {n, 1, \[Infinity]}]

works.

In general:

f[0]+Sum[f[n]-f[n-1],{n,1,Infinity}]

Phil Mendelsohn <mend0070 at tc.umn.edu> wrote in message
news:7n12ad$bcq at smc.vnet.net...
> I seem to have found a blind spot in my knowledge of how to get
> Mathematica to evaluate limits.
>
> I want to evaluate the limit of a function where the domain is a member
> of the Natural numbers, such as infinite series.  It seems that Limit
> assumes that the function is continuous.
>
> For example, if I asked
>
> Limit[Sin[ n Pi ],n-> Infinity], mathematica would return:
> Interval[{-1,1}].  This is true if n is a member of the Reals, but not
> true if n is a positive integer (in which case the limit would be 0.]
>
> Is there another function I should use?  Or would it be nice to specify
> the domain of the function as a feature request?
>
>
> Phil Mendelsohn
>




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