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MathGroup Archive 2000

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Re: Trying to define: Fractional Derivatives & Leibniz' display form for output and templates

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg23022] Re: Trying to define: Fractional Derivatives & Leibniz' display form for output and templates
  • From: Paul Abbott <paul at physics.uwa.edu.au>
  • Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 23:18:39 -0400 (EDT)
  • Organization: University of Western Australia
  • References: <8bhvta$noq@smc.vnet.net> <8c3hgm$b9g$1@dragonfly.wolfram.com>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

Mike Honeychurch wrote:

> To perform fractional derivatives or integrals (same thing) on functions it
> is should also be straight forward.  I'm not a mathematician so in what
> follows the terminology might be a tad dodgy.
>
> I don't have the texts in front of me but from memory the fractional
> calculus is pretty much just a type of convolution integral with a 1/gamma
> function out the front (I'm a chemist but you know what I mean!).

See the article

    Gerd Baumann, "Knocking on Leibniz's Door",
    Mathematica in Education and Research, 8(3-4): 58-65, 1999

which is all about fractional calculus.

Cheers,
    Paul



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