Mathematica 9 is now available
Services & Resources / Wolfram Forums
-----
 /
MathGroup Archive
2000
*January
*February
*March
*April
*May
*June
*July
*August
*September
*October
*November
*December
*Archive Index
*Ask about this page
*Print this page
*Give us feedback
*Sign up for the Wolfram Insider

MathGroup Archive 2000

[Date Index] [Thread Index] [Author Index]

Search the Archive

Re: Beginner Fractal Generation in Mathematica

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg26450] Re: Beginner Fractal Generation in Mathematica
  • From: "Borut L" <justmyname at email.si>
  • Date: Thu, 21 Dec 2000 01:51:51 -0500 (EST)
  • References: <91pk54$621@smc.vnet.net>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

> I am a beginner in Mathematica and need to know how to generate a Koch
> snowflake fractal. Please help.
>
> Thanks,
> Alan

Hi Alan,

An intuitive approach, imitating 'logo turtle graphics', is very convinient
for rather simplex, yet creative fractal graphics.
It goes like this:
You start by drawing a straight line in a specific direction. You are
drawing it until you bump into a rule, a rule that order you to change
direction. After rotating for a specific angle, you continue drawing a
straight line in that direction. And so on...

For Koch's curve this approach would look like this:

initial route:
F+F--F+F

where F meand 'forward', i.e. drawing a straight unit line and +/- means
'rotating for Pi/3' in positive/negative direction.

Now, n-th order Koch's curve will be an initial route, recursively gotten by
applying the

rule:
F -> F+F--F+F


Since you say you are a begginer in Mathematica, it might not be obvious for
you at the start to implement this in Mathematica. But afterall, aren't the
new things those from which we learn?

bye,

Borut Levart
a physics student




  • Prev by Date: Re: Integral involving erfc and j1
  • Next by Date: Re: SphericalPlot3D doesn't work
  • Previous by thread: Re: Beginner Fractal Generation in Mathematica
  • Next by thread: Integral involving erfc and j1