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MathGroup Archive 2000

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Re: Re: Mathematica Publication Question

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg25219] Re: [mg25069] Re: Mathematica Publication Question
  • From: Stephen Speicher <sjs at compbio.caltech.edu>
  • Date: Fri, 15 Sep 2000 02:21:52 -0400 (EDT)
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

Thanks for the suggestion, Jack, but Hales' work on the Kepler
conjecture hardly qualifies as a "closed-form solution" provided
by Mathematica.  I'm beginning to think that the claim is bogus,
perhaps an exaggeration of real work.

Stephen
sjs at compbio.caltech.edu

You can always tell a pioneer by the arrows in his back.

Printed using 100% recycled electrons.
--------------------------------------------------------

On Fri, 8 Sep 2000, Jack Goldberg wrote:

> Could he have been refering to Hale's solution of the Kepler conjecture
> involving packing spheres?  He (actually his doctoral student, Ferguson)
> used Mathematica as an integral part of the argument.
> 
> Jack
> 
> On Thu, 7 Sep 2000, Stephen Speicher wrote:
> 
> > On 3 Sep 2000, Stephen Speicher wrote:
> > 
> > > On a physics newsgroup, the following was written:
> > > 
> > >    "Recently a mathematician submitted a classic problem
> > >     to Mathematica, one thought to have no closed-form
> > >     solution. After churning away for eight hours, the
> > >     program created a publishable result.  When he
> > >     published the result, the mathematician in question
> > >     courageously admitted how he acquired it."
> > > 
> > > I personally asked the author for documentation of this, but he
> > > was unable to recall the source. Does anyone have some facts
> > > about this, or about a similar use of Mathematica?
> > > 
> > 
> > To be clear here, I'm not asking about work such as McCune's EQP
> > proof of the Robbins conjuecture, for which Mathematica was later
> > used to better understand and visualize the proof. The assertion
> > quoted above is for Mathematica itself to have solved a "classic
> > problem" for which no closed-form solution" was known.
> > 
> > Stephen
> > sjs at compbio.caltech.edu
> > 
> > You can always tell a pioneer by the arrows in his back.
> > 
> > Printed using 100% recycled electrons.
> > --------------------------------------------------------
> > 
> > 
> 
> 
> 
> 



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