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MathGroup Archive 2004

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Re: normal digits base 10 ( used to be: bimodal ditribution form counting signs of Pi digits differences)

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg51983] Re: normal digits base 10 ( used to be: bimodal ditribution form counting signs of Pi digits differences)
  • From: Roger Bagula <tftn at earthlink.net>
  • Date: Sat, 6 Nov 2004 02:07:51 -0500 (EST)
  • References: <cmcll1$i91$1@smc.vnet.net>
  • Reply-to: tftn at earthlink.net
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

Anonymous contributions, I have no idea where any of this came from:

1: An interesting paper on those who dispute Cantor's proof,
"An Editor Recalls Some Hopeless Papers" by Wilfred Hodges.
It gives one possible explanation for why this proof is considered
suspect by some and faults teaching methods as a contributing factor.
You can find this on the web or in university libraries.

2: You might consider trimming the ever growing "tail" of previously
posted pessages that is appended to each new message about the
distribution of Pi.  That is making each message longer and longer
and redistributing the same messages and names over and over.

3: If the properties of the Wolfram "30" CA have been proven it
might be interesting to ask for a reference to the source of that.
I wasn't aware that any of the evidence for this had been released
to anyone, other than claims that it is true.

4: It might be interesting to see a more theoretical analysis of
the observed behavior of the digits of Pi.  Since it seems that the
behavior is similar to a random walk, and since theoretical analysis
of random walk has been done many time, it might be possible to
adapt their analysis to the slightly different circumstances for pi.
For example, it might be feasible to come up with a probability that
the graph will stay within ±Sqrt[n] assuming that the digits are a
uniformly distributed random variable.

5: It doesn't appear that any party's position is going to change
on the question of randomness and pi, the lines are drawn, the
trenches dug, the guns in place, and it looks like France and the
first world war.  Feel free to not use any of this to prolong this :)



Respectfully, Roger L. Bagula
tftn at earthlink.net, 11759Waterhill Road, Lakeside,Ca 92040-2905,tel: 619-5610814 :
alternative email: rlbtftn at netscape.net
URL :  http://home.earthlink.net/~tftn





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