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MathGroup Archive 2004

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Re: ColorFunctions again (making z=0 be different from z=1)

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg50508] Re: ColorFunctions again (making z=0 be different from z=1)
  • From: Bill Rowe <readnewsciv at earthlink.net>
  • Date: Wed, 8 Sep 2004 05:15:27 -0400 (EDT)
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

On 9/7/04 at 5:43 AM, siegman at stanford.edu (AES/newspost) wrote:

>The simple  ColorFunction->Hue  option in Plot3D, ContourPlot, and
>DensityPlot, makes z = 0 appear the same as z = 1 (i.e., both
>bright red), a situation which seems to me to make these plots
>confusing and more difficult to interpret, given that "high peaks"
>and "sea level valleys" may be the most interesting features of
>such a plot.

>Do others have any favorite, not too messy ColorFunctions that make
>values near z = 0 tend toward white, or grey, or less bright, or
>something so that there's a clearly unidirectional visual effect
>going from values of z near 0 to those near z = 1?

What I do is create a ColorFunction to map z to a range of 0 to 1/2. For Example Compare the following two plots.


DensityPlot[Sin[(x + y)*y], {x, -2*Pi, 2*Pi}, {y, -2*Pi, 2*Pi}, 
   PlotPoints -> 100, Mesh -> False, ColorFunction -> Hue];

myColor[x_] := Hue[x/2]

DensityPlot[Sin[(x + y)*y], {x, -2*Pi, 2*Pi}, {y, -2*Pi, 2*Pi}, 
   PlotPoints -> 100, Mesh -> False, ColorFunction -> myColor]; 
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