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MathGroup Archive 2005

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"Mathematica in Education and Research"

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg60934] "Mathematica in Education and Research"
  • From: AES <siegman at stanford.edu>
  • Date: Tue, 4 Oct 2005 01:25:00 -0400 (EDT)
  • Organization: Stanford University
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

Just received the first email list-serve mailing that I can remember 
receiving from

   Mathematica in Education and Research
   
   "Volume 10 Issue number 4 is out now."

   <http://www.ijournals.net>

including the ToC and brief abstracts for that issue.  Don't know for 
sure how I got on this list, but I suspect I probably subscribed after 
seeing their List-Subscribe link: 

   <http://www.ijournals.net/lists/?p=subscribe&id=2>

in some posting on this group.

I'd like to ask for any info anyone may have about the publication and 
distribution policies of this publication.  I was slightly interested in 
one of the articles in that issue, but when I went to the web site to 
get it, I discovered that to download a full article I'm apparently 
supposed to subscribe, at $45/year.

I happen to be involved in the publication activities of several major 
professional societies that expend a great deal of resources in  
publishing important peer-reviewed technical journals.  Many if not most 
such journals these days are put on line _for free_ to the general 
public, in full text format, after an "embargo period" in the range of 3 
months to a year.  Some are published in this fashion from day one; and 
the trend is more and more toward free distribution of such information.

Does MiER have such an embargo period? Or, does it have an institutional 
subscription rate?  I can only say that even with an adequate personal 
income and a substantial interest in Mathematica, the chance of my 
paying $45/year for a subscription to this particular publication is 
essentially zero -- and the chance of my urging my university to pay 
very much more than that for an institutional online subscription is 
equally small.


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