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MathGroup Archive 2005

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Re: Re: Re: Use of CAS in introductory science&engineering courses

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg61694] Re: [mg61656] Re: [mg61623] Re: Use of CAS in introductory science&engineering courses
  • From: Renan <renan.birck at gmail.com>
  • Date: Wed, 26 Oct 2005 01:01:51 -0400 (EDT)
  • References: <djfnco$avq$1@smc.vnet.net> <200510240544.BAA29073@smc.vnet.net> <200510250107.VAA16832@smc.vnet.net>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

On 10/24/05, Pratik Desai <pdesai1 at umbc.edu> wrote:


> I wonder what the core language of  a calculator could be :-) ,  for me
> mathematica is essentially a souped up calculator. I expect nothing more
> and nothing less...............

The HP calculators, (at least the HP-48) use a custom language (System
RPL) together with machine language - you can actually program using
this language (rather than the "end-user" language - User RPL) but HP
does not support it.

And for me Mathematica is more than a calculator - it is a programming
language for "exact sciences" (mathematics, physics, engineering...).


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