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MathGroup Archive 2006

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solid of revolution

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg64699] solid of revolution
  • From: Murray Eisenberg <murray at math.umass.edu>
  • Date: Tue, 28 Feb 2006 01:49:29 -0500 (EST)
  • Organization: Mathematics & Statistics, Univ. of Mass./Amherst
  • Reply-to: murray at math.umass.edu
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

Is there some nice way to build a convincing 3D graphics representation 
of a solid of revolution such as that obtained by rotating around the 
line y = 1 the region in the xy-plane that is enclosed by y = Sin[x], x 
= 0, and x = Pi?

Note that Graphics`SurfaceOfRevolution`SurfaceOfRevolution, used 
directly, gives not the desired solid, but rather a picture of its 
bounding surface.  The trouble with this picture is that it looks like 
the solid is what's inside the surface, whereas the desired solid is 
obtained from the bounding rectangular parallelepiped by "scooping out" 
what's inside the surface.


-- 
Murray Eisenberg                     murray at math.umass.edu
Mathematics & Statistics Dept.
Lederle Graduate Research Tower      phone 413 549-1020 (H)
University of Massachusetts                413 545-2859 (W)
710 North Pleasant Street            fax   413 545-1801
Amherst, MA 01003-9305


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