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Re: Math Formulas

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg92716] Re: Math Formulas
  • From: John <jwa0 at lehigh.edu>
  • Date: Sat, 11 Oct 2008 06:44:42 -0400 (EDT)
  • References: <gckn71$noe$1@smc.vnet.net> <gcn4hp$7as$1@smc.vnet.net>

On Oct 10, 4:42 am, Bob F <deepyog... at gmail.com> wrote:
> On Oct 9, 4:42 am, John <j... at lehigh.edu> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Mathematica 6, WindowsXP
>
> >  NotebookPut[
> >  Notebook[{Cell["October 7, 2008", "Text", TextAlignment -> 1,
> >     FontSize -> 24, Bold,
> >     CellMargins -> {{Inherited, Inherited}, {50, Inherited}}],
> >    Cell["Probability Of Acceptance", "Section", "Text",
> >     CellFrame -> False,
> >     CellMargins -> {{Inherited, Inherited}, {4, 3}}],
> >    Cell["Use the formula,", "Text", TextJustification -> 1,
> >     Hyphenation -> True, FontSize -> 16, Bold, CellFrame -> False,
> >     CellMargins -> {{Inherited, Inherited}, {10, Inherited}}],
> >    Cell[BoxData[
> >      RowBox[{ RowBox[{"(", GridBox[{{"c"}, {"i"}}], ")"}],
> >        SuperscriptBox["p", "i"],
> >        SuperscriptBox["(1-p)", "c-i"]}] ] ,        "Tex=
t"=
> ,
> >     FontSize -> 16, Bold, TextJustification -> 1, Hyphenation -> Tr=
ue=
> ,
> >      CellMargins -> {{Inherited + 35, Inherited}, {10, Inherited}=
}]=
> ,
> >    Cell["to compute the probability that acceptance sampling deems =
a =
> \
> > lot to be acceptable. Values of n, c amd p are specified by the \
> > user.", "Text", FontSize -> 16, Bold, TextJustification -> 1,
> >     Hyphenation -> True, CellFrame -> False,
> >     CellMargins -> {{Inherited, Inherited}, {10, Inherited}}]}]]
>
> > The cell that prints the  formula was suggested to me by Bob. It
> > prints the formula correctly.
> > My attempts to insert a summation sign in front of the formula failed.
> > The command
>
> >     Sum[f,{i,0,c}]
>
> > didn't do the job. Maybe I didn't put it in the right place.
>
> > Latex formulas are elegant (suitable for framing). Can Mathematica
> > match the elegance of Latex? If so I want to know how to do it.
>
> > John
>
> John,
>
> One way is to do:
>
> NotebookPut[
>  Notebook[{Cell["October 7, 2008", "Text", TextAlignment -> 1,
>     FontSize -> 24, Bold,
>     CellMargins -> {{Inherited, Inherited}, {50, Inherited}}],
>    Cell["Probability Of Acceptance", "Section", "Text",
>     CellFrame -> False,
>     CellMargins -> {{Inherited, Inherited}, {4, 3}}],
>    Cell["Use the formula,", "Text", TextJustification -> 1,
>     Hyphenation -> True, FontSize -> 16, Bold, CellFrame -> False,
>     CellMargins -> {{Inherited, Inherited}, {10, Inherited}}],
>    Cell[BoxData[
>      RowBox[{RowBox[{UnderoverscriptBox["\[Sum]",
>           RowBox[{"i", "=", "0"}], "c"], "(", GridBox[{{"c"},=
 {"i"}}],
>           ")"}], SuperscriptBox["p", "i"],
>        SuperscriptBox["(1-p)", "c-i"]}]], "Text", FontSize -> 16,
>     Bold, TextJustification -> 1, Hyphenation -> True,
>     CellMargins -> {{Inherited + 35, Inherited}, {10, Inherited}}],
>    Cell["to compute the probability that acceptance sampling deems a
>         lot to be acceptable. Values of n, c amd p are specified =
by
> the
>         user.", "Text", FontSize -> 16, Bold, TextJustification -=
> 1,
>     Hyphenation -> True, CellFrame -> False,
>     CellMargins -> {{Inherited, Inherited}, {10, Inherited}}]}]]
>
> But this is so much work, there must be a better way. And there is.
> Use Mathematica as it was designed to create a technical document and
> try the following: (don't forget that you need to highlight the
> desired text or cell and then apply the indicated command - I have
> specified the Mac menu commands and shortcuts, so if you have a
> Windows or Linux or other version of Mathematica substitute the
> correct menu command or shortcut, although the menu commands are
> usually the same)
>
> 1. File/New Notebook (or Command-n keyboard shortcut)
> 2. Type in "October 7, 2008" and set it to be a "Text" style cell
> (Format/Style/Text or Command-7 shortcut), with a font size of your
> choice (Format/Size/Larger or shortcut Command-= on a Mac) and right
> justified (Format/Text Alignment/Align Right), and make it bold
> (Format/Face/Bold or Command-b shortcut)
> 3. Create the next cell with "Probability Of Acceptance" as a
> "Section" cell (Format/Style/Section or shortcut Command-4) and change
> the text size and boldness as in step 2
> 4. Create the next cell with "Use the formula," as a "Text" cell with
> size and boldness as desired
> 5. Create the next cell with the formula as a "Text" cell, then use
> the"BasicMathInput" palette to enter the Sum, the binomial
> coeffecient, and the exponential elements of the formula, and then set
> the size and boldness as desired
> 6. Create the next cell with the "to compute the ..." phrase as a Text
> cell with size and boldness as desired
> 7. You can indent the formula by using the Ruler - first highlight the
> formula cell (click on the cell bracket is one way), then just drag
> the margin indicators right underneath the ruler (they look like bold
> right angle symbols) to adjust the left margin to the desired amount.
> You can turn on the "Ruler" from the "Window" menu command, and you
> might also turn on the "Toolbar" as well. The Toolbar shows what style
> the current cell is (Section, Text, Input, Output, etc) and shows text
> justification and font shortcuts too, as well as a Print and Help
> icons. I prefer to have both (Ruler and Toolbar) visible at all times,
> but that is entirely up to you as to what you prefer.
>
> You are done - and not one BoxData, or Grid or anything. So you need
> to explore how to create cells of different types (Section,
> subsection, text, input, etc) and how to modify their visual
> attributes, rather than create them with the low-level Mathematica
> commands like LaTeX does. This is so much easier IMO, but if you
> really want to you can look at the underlying code by doing a "Cell/
> Show Expression" menu command to see all the low-level commands that
> form the document you see. By the way, if you want several cells to
> have the same attributes, highlight several of them at once by
> clicking on the first cell bracket while holding the "Shift" key, and
> then click on the last cell bracket, then do the size, style, etc
> commands to all of them at once. If some of the cells are not adjacent
> to each other (for example the 1st, 3rd and 5th cells you want to all
> change to bold), then use the Command key instead of the Shift key and
> click on only the desired cells before doing the desired change.
>
> I would post the resulting notebook, but don't know how to get complex
> equations like this example to reproduce correctly -- can someone
> suggest how to do this? I will e-mail John the resulting notebook
> separately so he can see exactly what the notebook looks like when
> created this way.
>
> You can also start to explore the use of cell groups where you might
> have some Input cell with a long program to create a plot, but you
> dont really want to show the code in a presentation - in that case put
> the code and the plot in a cell group, then double-click on one or the
> other to hide the other cells in the group, e.g. double-click on the
> cell bracket of the plot and the input cell with the code is hidden,
> or double click on the input cell with the code and the plot is
> hidden. But notice that an Input cell with a program is always a
> member of the cell group that also contains it's output cell, so the
> step to make them part of a group may already be done. To get back the
> hidden cells, just double-click on the outermost cell bracket on the
> right of the notebook window. To group several cells together, just
> click on their cell brackets and then do a "Cell/Grouping/Group Cells"
> menu command. You can put as few as 2 or as many as desired in a
> group. You can ungroup them later as well with the "Cell/Grouping/
> Ungroup cells" menu command.
>
> You can also turn on or off the cell brackets so they are invisible or
> visible as you wish. One way to do this is with the Option Inspector,
> but be careful setting things with the Option Inspector as it can do
> things that are not easy to undo.
>
> Doing things this way, avoids having to deal with the low-level code
> that John's example has. It is hard at first to remember where all the
> commands are and what the shortcuts are, but as with anything else,
> the more you use it the more you will remember.
>
> Hope this helps explain things a bit. But explore using Mathematica on
> your own and look at as many different ways of using as possible to
> see how versatile and powerful it is.
>
> Also, I think there is a mistake as the phrase "Values of n, c and p"
> should be "Values of c, i, and p" (there is no "n" in this equation).
>
> -Bob Freeman

Bob,

There is a mistake in my formula. The upper number in the
combinatorial formula should be n and the exponent of (1-p) should be
n-i. I am still working on the alternate method that you described in
your message.

Thank you for your helpful advice.

John


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