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Re: mathematica 6.0.3 and mac os x 10.5.5 crashes?

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg92206] Re: mathematica 6.0.3 and mac os x 10.5.5 crashes?
  • From: Jean-Marc Gulliet <jeanmarc.gulliet at gmail.com>
  • Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2008 07:30:49 -0400 (EDT)
  • Organization: The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK
  • References: <gb7oeu$nke$1@smc.vnet.net>

Mitch Murphy wrote:

> has anyone else being having frequent crashes with mathematica 6.0.3  
> and mac os x 10.5.5? i'm not sure if the latest leopard update 10.5.5  
> has anything to do with this problem, afaik that's the only thing that  
> has changed on my machine recently.

I have upgraded my system last week from Leopard 1.5.4 to 1.5.5 and did 
not notice anything unusual since then (no crash nor freeze). For 
instance, the large Monte Carlo simulations I am running day and night 
for now several weeks  have ran correctly since the Mac OS X upgrade. 
Nothing special to report either when dealing with symbolic computations.

> i've also been getting a lot of spinning color wheels of death? i  
> really hope wolfram people are getting crash reports from apple.

Some of the features as use the less are dynamic interactivity (say, 
Manipulate and the like). If I remember correctly, I had some crashes 
when reading the online help on functions such as Manipulate (page with 
a lot of examples), but that was before Mac OS X 1.5.5 anyway. Do you 
use this kind of features?

> is 6.0.3 the most recent mac os x version? i couldn't find that  
> information on the wolfram website.

As of today, I am not aware of any version beyond 6.0.3 for Mac OS X.

Regards,
-- Jean-Marc


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