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Re: Re: Mathematica for gifted elementary school children


But interacting with the demonstrations, while it can be educational, is 
not really being very creative or being engaged in learning Mathematica 
(unless one studies the code -- which tends to be rather more 
sophisticated than a rank beginner would want to see).

Doing computations oneself, building graphic images oneself -- those 
things can be educational and creative and contribute toward learning 
Mathematica and learning how to learn Mathematica.

Sort of the difference between playing a video game and creating a video 
game.

Bob F wrote:
> On Apr 20, 5:09 pm, Beliavsky <beliav... at aol.com> wrote:
>> My son, almost 6, is good at math and inquisitive. Is there a math
>> curriculum for elementary school children that uses Mathematica? He
>> understands the four arithemetic operations and the concept of powers.
>> I have Mathematica installed on my home PC and could teach him myself.
>>
>> I have written computer programs in Fortran in front of him to
>> demonstrate concepts such as cubes and cube roots. We had fun, but I
>> don't want to explain right now why 1000000000**3 gives -402653184 or
>> 1/2 gives 0.
>>
>> He is interested in the number "centillion" (10^303) and thought it
>> was cool to see the 101 zeros when we asked Mathematica to compute
>> centillion^(1/3).
>>
>> I see there are some math courseware athttp://library.wolfram.com/infocenter/Courseware/Mathematics/
>> , but those topics are too advanced for him at present. Maybe I should
>> give him Wolfram's huge book and let him play when he wants.
> 
> Try looking thru the demonstrations web site (at http://demonstrations.wolfram.com
> ). There are some really nice things and some are very well
> illustrated and fun to play with. There is even a "Kids and Fun"
> section at http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/topics.html#10
> 
> Enjoy...
> 
> -Bob
> 

-- 
Murray Eisenberg                     murray at math.umass.edu
Mathematics & Statistics Dept.
Lederle Graduate Research Tower      phone 413 549-1020 (H)
University of Massachusetts                413 545-2859 (W)
710 North Pleasant Street            fax   413 545-1801
Amherst, MA 01003-9305


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