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Re: Undo in Mathematica

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg105098] Re: Undo in Mathematica
  • From: TWJ <twj at wolfram.com>
  • Date: Sat, 21 Nov 2009 03:32:03 -0500 (EST)
  • References: <200911191225.HAA19386@smc.vnet.net> <he5vcq$3it$1@smc.vnet.net>



> I am really curious how people develop large libraries in M.

People use all sorts of different tools and practices.
But a lot of people do use Wolfram Workbench -- this includes
a lot of developers at Wolfram Research who use it for Mathematica
development, and Mathematica is full of huge Mathematica libraries.
The same is true for Wolfram Alpha.

For large (and small) library development, the Workbench gives
a tremendous number of useful features, completely too many
to list in a posting like this.  It has a project based approach,
so you can work with multiple files,  this is useful to separate
different components.

One example, of its functionality is that all the syntax/semantic
warnings and errors (and there are very many classes of these)
found in any files are all summarized in one report.  This is
much more useful than only seeing just those problems in the
part of the file you happen to have open.

Also, you get an integrated debugger, unit tester, profiler and
source control.

And it does have a nice multi-stage undo.


You can get more idea of its features from the website
(there are a bunch of screencasts)...

http://www.wolfram.com/products/workbench/




When you say:
  'but my understanding is that the workbench currently is
  not as interactive as the notebook editor'

I'd be curious to know what you mean.  Usually the types
of things that the Workbench is not so good for is free-form
mathematical explorations that mix typesetting, visualizations,
etc...   The FrontEnd is very good for this.


But for producing Mathematica packages, applications etc...,
the Workbench is very appealing.


Tom Wickham-Jones
Wolfram Research




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