Mathematica 9 is now available
Services & Resources / Wolfram Forums / MathGroup Archive
-----

MathGroup Archive 2010

[Date Index] [Thread Index] [Author Index]

Search the Archive

Re: if using Mathematica to solve an algebraic problem

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg108999] Re: if using Mathematica to solve an algebraic problem
  • From: Bill Rowe <readnews at sbcglobal.net>
  • Date: Fri, 9 Apr 2010 03:34:55 -0400 (EDT)

On 4/8/10 at 8:03 AM, dave at removedbailey.co.uk (David Bailey) wrote:

>I also think that if Mathematica had been available to me back then,
>I would have felt it was a bit like an addictive substance - very
>interesting in small doses, but also terribly dangerous. There would
>have always been the possibility of becoming skilled in answering
>questions through Mathematica, rather than actually learning the
>subject!

While I think I understand the concern you express here, I still
wonder. If one becomes very skilled at using Mathematica to
solve problems correctly wouldn't there have to be some
corresponding gain in understanding of how the same problems
would be solved without Mathematica?

The point I am trying to get at is areas Mathematica fails or
shows limitations invariably require understanding of details of
the problem and computer arithmetic. It seems becoming highly
skilled at getting correct results from Mathematica requires
mastery of these details to a large degree. And it also seems
understanding those details are exactly what is required to
solve the problem without Mathematica.

I wonder if it is really possible to become highly skilled at
getting good results from Mathematica without also learning the subject.



  • Prev by Date: there is an "oops" with Root and Limit
  • Next by Date: Re: ParametricPlot3D - plane appears contracted in some directions
  • Previous by thread: Re: if using Mathematica to solve an algebraic problem
  • Next by thread: Re: if using Mathematica to solve an algebraic problem