Mathematica 9 is now available
Services & Resources / Wolfram Forums / MathGroup Archive
-----

MathGroup Archive 2013

[Date Index] [Thread Index] [Author Index]

Search the Archive

Re: Mathematica and Lisp

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg129998] Re: Mathematica and Lisp
  • From: Bob Hanlon <hanlonr357 at gmail.com>
  • Date: Sun, 3 Mar 2013 22:57:36 -0500 (EST)
  • Delivered-to: l-mathgroup@mail-archive0.wolfram.com
  • Delivered-to: l-mathgroup@wolfram.com
  • Delivered-to: mathgroup-newout@smc.vnet.net
  • Delivered-to: mathgroup-newsend@smc.vnet.net
  • References: <kgse4s$jam$1@smc.vnet.net>

"@@@ ?"

The operator @@@ has been used and explained multiple times on this
newsgroup and is documented in the Mathematica help.

Select @@@ then hit function key F1 and the search results includes a
link to the help page for the Apply function. The summary under the
link for Apply includes "f @@@ expr replaces heads at level 1 of expr
by f."  Looking under Details and Options on the Apply help page is
the statement "f@@@expr is equivalent to Apply[f, expr, {1}]". For
example,

data = Array[a, {3, 2}]

{{a[1, 1], a[1, 2]}, {a[2, 1], a[2, 2]}, {a[3, 1], a[3, 2]}}

f @@@ data

{f[a[1, 1], a[1, 2]], f[a[2, 1], a[2, 2]], f[a[3, 1], a[3, 2]]}

f @@@ data == (f @@ # & /@ data) ==
 Apply[f, data, 1] == Apply[f, data, {1}]

True


Bob Hanlon


On Sun, Mar 3, 2013 at 2:22 AM, Richard Fateman <fateman at cs.berkeley.edu> wrote:
> On 3/2/2013 12:44 AM, Bill Rowe wrote:
> ...
>
> <snip>
> I mostly agree with you!
>
>>
>> I agree Mathematica is different in a great many ways. And I can
>> see how someone experienced in say C or another language would
>> see Mathematica as strange and unusual. But I really don't see
>> the problem of understanding Mathematica symbols, precedence
>> etc. as being any different than learning pointers are other
>> aspects of C. It is simply a matter of study and using
>> Mathematica just as it is a case of study and using C to learn
>> pointers etc.
>>
>
> C is not my favorite programming language .. see
> www.cs.berkeley.edu/~fateman/papers/software.pdf
>
> Nevertheless one can almost argue that if you know about
> how computers work on the assembly language level you have
> a modest chance of mapping C constructs to assembler-like
> code "in your head".  I've taught this as part of an
> undergraduate course in "Machine Structures".
>
> For EF, the number of unfamiliar operators and the
> number of distinct precedences is substantial.
>
> There is a table in the virtual book documentation "operation precedence"
> in the section Operator Input Forms.
>
>   There are roughly
> 69 different precedence categories listed.
>
> In some precedence classes there are many forms.
> For example in the category 4th from the bottom there are these
> operators which, being in the same class, would be parsed from
> left to right (or is it right to left?) anyway, here they are.
>
> =, :=, ^=, ^:=,  =. ->,
>    and also the matchfix
> /:   =
> /:  :=
>
> While some of the operators have no built-in meaning, and some are
> pretty obscure, they are all part of the syntax. There are also quite
> a few multi-character operators, some of which are new to me.. @@@ ?
>
>   This is an attempt to document one of reasons I think EF is NOT just
> as easy to learn as any other language. I've previous mentioned other
> reasons which can be grouped generally under the category "semantics".
>
> RJF
>
>
>
>
>
>>
>
>



  • Prev by Date: Re: Conjugate
  • Next by Date: How to find the roots of non linear equations
  • Previous by thread: Re: Mathematica and Lisp
  • Next by thread: Re: Mathematica and Lisp