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Student Support Forum: 'How to plot multiple log-scale black body spect...' topicStudent Support Forum > General > "How to plot multiple log-scale black body spect..."

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Bill Simpson
10/14/12 00:59am

If you didn't want a LogPlot then this

http://reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/BlackBodyRadiation/tutorial/BlackBodyRadiation.html

would seem to do everything you want.

But, since you want a LogPlot, I do not see a way to use that functionality to get the plot you want and things seem to get interesting and more challenging than I would expect the average user to be able to figure out. What follows is my assembling pieces from a variety of different places.

I hope this plots the Planck function for T=3000, 4000 and 5000 Kelvin for wavelengths from .2 to 3 microns, all on top of each other.

In[1]:= <<PhysicalConstants`

In[2]:= h=PlanckConstant/(Joule Second);
c=SpeedOfLight/(Meter/Second);
k=BoltzmannConstant/(Joule/Kelvin);
planckFunction[t_,x_]:=((2 Pi h c^2)/x^5)/(Exp[h c/k/(x*t)]-1);
g1=LogPlot[planckFunction[3000,x],{x,.2*10^-6,3*10^-6}];
g2=LogPlot[planckFunction[4000,x],{x,.2*10^-6,3*10^-6}];
g3=LogPlot[planckFunction[5000,x],{x,.2*10^-6,3*10^-6}];
Show[g3,g2,g1]

Please check this carefully to see if this is correct. It is certainly possible that I have made some mistake in trying to reverse engineer these bits and pieces. Perhaps you can check the results against the non-LogPlot results from BlackBodyProfile and see if you can expose any mistakes when using the temperatures and wavelengths appropriate for your problem.


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Subject (listing for 'How to plot multiple log-scale black body spect...')
Author Date Posted
How to plot multiple log-scale black body spect... Andy 10/12/12 2:46pm
Re: How to plot multiple log-scale black body s... Bill Simpson 10/14/12 00:59am
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