Services & Resources / Wolfram Forums
-----
 /
MathGroup Archive
1994
*January
*February
*March
*April
*May
*June
*July
*October
*November
*December
*Archive Index
*Ask about this page
*Print this page
*Give us feedback
*Sign up for the Wolfram Insider

MathGroup Archive 1994

[Date Index] [Thread Index] [Author Index]

Search the Archive

MathSource: New Materials (long)

  • To: mathgroup at yoda.physics.unc.edu
  • Subject: MathSource: New Materials (long)
  • From: msadmin (MathSource Administrator)
  • Date: Wed, 18 May 1994 12:14:50 -0500

	New Materials on MathSource
	---------------------------

MathSource is an on-line collection of Mathematica
notebooks, packages, documentation, and related-materials
contributed by Mathematica users around the world and by the
staff here at Wolfram Research.  It is freely accessible via
electronic mail, Gopher, anonymous FTP, and direct dialup. 


For more information about MathSource, send an email message
containing the line 


	Help Intro

to the MathSource server at

	MathSource at wri.com

To obtain a full listing of all materials in MathSource, send an
email message containing the line 


	Find *

to the MathSource server.

The following list contains materials that have recently been added
to the MathSource collection or updated with new versions.  To have
any of the materials in this list sent to you automatically, send
an email message containing the command

	Send XXXX-XXX

to the MathSource server at MathSource at wri.com, where XXXX-XXX
is the item-number given in the listing.

Questions and comments about MathSource should be addressed to
ms-admin at wri.com.

=============================================================
New materials in MathSource


0202-699: How to Contact Wolfram Research (May 5, 1994)
          Author: Wolfram Research
          This includes information on how to reach different departments in
          both the United States office and the  United Kingdom office. 

          There are several email, phone, and mail addresses.

          0011:  addresses.txt Addresses and important numbers (May 5, 1994;
                 2 kilobytes)


0203-487: Relativistic Interstellar Space Flight (April 22, 1994)
          Author: Al Kaufman
          Interstellar.ma  uses the Bright Star Catalog to generate
          relativistically accurate movies of a flight to any star in the
          catalog.  The user specifies: 1) the destination star; 2) the
          constant acceleration for the trip (in units of "g"); 3) the
          direction in which the camera should point

          0011:  Interstellar.ma Mathematica notebook to generate animations
                 (April 1994; 15 kilobytes)

          0022:  StarCatalog.txt Plain-text file containing star data for
                 Interstellar.ma (April 1994; 88 kilobytes)

          0033:  Sirius.ma Notebook containing animated "spaceflight" 

                 (August 1992; 4703 kilobytes)

          0044:  Sirius.movie.sit.hqx Binhexed self-extrating-archive
                 QuickTime movie for the Macintosh (August 1992; 878
                 kilobytes)


0204-691: calcE Demo for Mathematica V2.0 (March 1994)
          Author: Richard Mercer
          calcE is a collection of Mathematica  packages which increase the
          power and ease of use of Mathematica for everyday tasks such as 

          two-dimensional graphics, displaying tables of data, and solving
          equations. calcE was developed for use in a teaching laboratory. 

          It allows novices to learn Mathematica quickly and gently with its
          natural and forgiving syntax, and allows experts to work more
          efficiently, often requiring 3 to 10 times fewer characters for 

          the creation of complex graphics. Anyone who uses Mathematica as a
          general tool should find this product useful.

          Note: Because these examples are primarily saved graphics, 

          separate notebooks are provided for versions 2.1 and higher of 

          Mathematica and for version 2.0.  These demo notebooks are for
          version 2.0 of Mathematica.  The version 2.1 and higher notebooks
          can be found under item number 0206-435.

          0011:  readmE.txt Author's notes, plain text format (February 

                 1994; 2 kilobytes)

          0022:  readmE.ma Author's notes, notebook format (February 1994; 7
                 kilobytes)

          0033:  EDemoI20.ma calcE demo notebook for Mathematica V2.0
                 (February 1994; 305 kilobytes)

          0044:  EDemoII20.ma calcE demo notebook for Mathematica V2.0
                 (February 1994; 783 kilobytes)


0205-254: C, FORTRAN77, Maple and TeX Code Generation Package (May 12, 1994)
          Author: Mark Sofroniou
          Format.m is a package which extends Mathematica's built-in
          formatting rules.  Examples of the shortcomings of the standard
          format functions are given, where code generated may not be
          syntactically correct and of appropriate precision.  The package
          addresses these shortcomings and extends the formatting rules to
          include lists as data objects and assignments to expressions.
          Optimized computational sequences are now possible, utilizing the
          additional package Optimize.m. Examples are given to show how the
          package may be used to considerably enhance and automate code
          generation. The result is a symbiosis of symbolic-numeric
          environments built upon the existing Splice communication process.
          Some examples from applied numerical mathematics are given, where
          the package can been used to establish a generalised formulation 

          to a problem via the use of a template file.

          0011:  README.txt Author's notes (May 12, 1994; 2 kilobytes)

          0022:  Format.m Mathematica package (May 12, 1994; 64 kilobytes)

          0033:  Format.tex Documentation in LaTeX form (May 12, 1994; 109
                 kilobytes)

          0044:  Format.sty LaTeX style file for Format.tex (May 12, 1994; 1
                 kilobyte)

          0055:  driver.f Main driver routine (May 12, 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0066:  example.mf Simple FORTRAN77 main routine template file (May
                 12, 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0077:  func.mf FORTRAN77 function routine template file (May 12,
                 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0088:  newton.mf FORTRAN77 template file for Newton's method. Uses
                 the LAPACK linear solution routine provided in the file
                 linsolv.f (May 12, 1994; 3 kilobytes)

          0099:  rksub.mf FORTRAN77 template file for the Runge-Kutta method
                 (May 12, 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0101:  sub.mf A FORTRAN77 subroutine template file (May 12, 1994; 

                 1 kilobyte)

          0112:  linsolv.f LAPACK linear solution and LU decomposition for
                 use with the template file newton.mf (May 12, 1994; 66
                 kilobytes)

          0123:  Format.ps Documentation in PostScript form (May 12, 1994;
                 329 kilobytes)


0205-412: Beam Statics Package (May 10, 1994)
          Author: Levent Kitis
          The package BeamStatics.m is intended as a sample program for
          engineering students enrolled in a strength of materials course. 

          The package accepts as input: 1) concentrated loads; 2) constant 

          or linearly distributed loads; 3) boundary conditions; 4) flexural
          rigidity; 5) length of the beam; and 6) rigid in-span support
          locations.  The output produced includes a picture of the beam and
          the loads acting on it, as well as diagrams showing the 

          deflection, slope, bending moment, and shear force.

          0011:  Usage.txt User's guide with examples (May 6, 1994; 7
                 kilobytes)

          0022:  BeamStatics.m Mathematica package (May 6, 1994; 11
                 kilobytes)


0206-053: Customizing the X Front End (May 5, 1994)
          Author: John Fultz
          One of the great advantages of the X Window System is the ability
          to customize applications.  By modifying a resource file (a file
          that contains settings pertinent to an application or utility), 

          you can change hundreds of details about the way any X program
          runs, from color to fonts to button sizes to default directories. 

          Unfortunately, this feature can also be one of the most confusing.
          X has thousands of modifications that can be made to its 

          resources, and each application program can add hundreds or
          thousands more.  This notebook discusses some of the modifications
          that can be made to the X front end for Mathematica.

          0011:  CustomXFE.ma Mathematica notebook (May 1994; 20 kilobytes)


0206-345: sci2mma -- A Filter to Convert Data in Scientific Notation Format
          to Mathematica Input Format (May 10, 1994)
          Author: Tyler Perkins
          sci2mma acts as a filter or file conversion utility to convert
          occurances of strings of the form "1.234e-5" to "1.234*10^-5 . 

          Thus a text file produced by a program written in C, Fortran, 

          etc., may be used as input to Mathematica using its Get function.

          0011:  sci2mma Unix shell script (January 20, 1994; 2 kilobytes)

          0022:  mktemp Temporary-file utility used by sci2mma (May 6, 1994;
                 3 kilobytes)


0206-435: calcE Demo for Mathematica V2.1 and Higher (March 1994)
          Author: Richard Mercer
          calcE is a collection of Mathematica  packages which increase the
          power and ease of use of Mathematica for everyday tasks such as 

          two-dimensional graphics, displaying tables of data, and solving
          equations. calcE was developed for use in a teaching laboratory. 

          It allows novices to learn Mathematica quickly and gently with its
          natural and forgiving syntax, and allows experts to work more
          efficiently, often requiring 3 to 10 times fewer characters for 

          the creation of complex graphics. Anyone who uses Mathematica as a
          general tool should find this product useful.

          Note: Because these examples are primarily saved graphics, 

          separate notebooks are provided for versions 2.1 and higher of 

          Mathematica and for version 2.0.  These demo notebooks are for
          Mathematica version 2.1 and higher.  The version 2.0 notebooks can
          be found under item number 0204-691.

          0011:  readmE.txt Author's notes, plain text format (February 

                 1994; 2 kilobytes)

          0022:  readmE.ma Author's notes, notebook format (February 1994; 7
                 kilobytes)

          0033:  EDemoI.ma calcE demo notebook for Mathematica V2.1 and
                 higher (February 1994; 254 kilobytes)

          0044:  EDemoII.ma calcE demo notebook for Mathematica V2.1 and
                 higher (February 1994; 412 kilobytes)


0206-547: Runge-Kutta-Nystrom Integrator (May 10, 1994)
          Author: Beatrice Paternoster
          This package integrates system of non-stiff second-order ordinary
          differential equations of type y"=f(t,y) with fixed stepsize by a
          Runge-Kutta Nystrom method of order six (J.R.Dormand, P.J.Prince;
          Runge-Kutta-Nystrom triples, Comp. and Math. with Appl., 14(1988),
          1007-1017).

          0011:  RKNystrom.m Mathematica package (May 10, 1994; 3 kilobytes)

          0022:  RKNystrom.doc Documentation for RKNystrom.m (May 10, 1994; 

                 4 kilobytes)


0206-558: Manipulating Polynomials with Multiple Variables (May 5, 1994)
          Author: George Hutchinson
          The package PolyMV.m provides 26 defined operations useful for
          interactive manipulation of large polynomials with multiple
          variables into equivalent forms.  These include:

          *  Controlled separations of polynomials into subpolynomial lists
          to facilitate computations and examination

          *  Fine control of factoring and expansion operations

          *  Polynomial predicates to assist in finding terms and defining
          operations

          *  Auxiliary operations for display, easy access to polynomial
          parts, and factored computation of symbolic matrix determinants

          A talk given at the Mathematica Developer Conference (Champaign,
          IL), April, 1994, with some later additions.  A related article
          "Manipulating Polynomials with Multiple Variables" has been
          submitted to The Mathematica Journal.

          0011:  PolyMV.m Mathematica package (May 6, 1994; 36 kilobytes)

          0022:  ConfTalk.txt Plain-text copy of Conference talk (May 6,
                 1994; 18 kilobytes)

          0033:  ILLUS.ma Mathematica notebook illustrating PolyMV.m (April
                 20, 1994; 13 kilobytes)


0206-569: Numerical Linear Algebra (Direct Methods) (May 11, 1994)
          Author: Jesus Rojo
          The packages Numerico.m and Numerial.m provide routines for direct
          methods of solving linear systems.  These routines include vector
          norms, LU decomposition, and Choleski decomposition.

          0011:  Numerico.m Mathematica package (April 27, 1994; 2 

                 kilobytes)

          0022:  Numerial.m Mathematica package (April 27, 1994; 61
                 kilobytes)

          0033:  NumDocum.txt Plain-text documentation for Numerico.m and
                 Numerial.m (April 27, 1994; 10 kilobytes)

          0044:  NumSampl.ma Sample Mathematica notebook (April 27, 1994; 10
                 kilobytes)


0206-570: Order and Disorder (May 1, 1994)
          Author: D.C.M. Burbulla
          Part of this notebook arose from our book (by D.C.M. Burbulla and 

          C.T.J. Dodson) "Self-Tutor For Computer Calculus Using Mathematica
          2" available in English (Prentice-Hall Canada) and Japanese
          (Prentice-Hall Japan).  It illustrates on the one hand how Fourier
          transforms can reveal order in apparent disorder, sometimes, but
          other times we need to consider nested functions to detect order.
          Another example illustrates functional iteration and the study of
          fixed points, showing how chaotic behaviour can sometimes ensue.
          Both illustrations have ample graphics; they appeared in
          Mathematica in Education Vol. 2, No. 4, (1993) pp. 11-14,
          MathSource item 0205-883.

          0011:  OrderDisorder.ma Mathematica notebook (April 1994; 88
                 kilobytes)


0206-581: Self Tutor for Calculus I (May 1, 1994)
          Author: D.C.M. Burbulla
          This notebook supports our book (by D.C.M. Burbulla and C.T.J.
          Dodson) "Self-Tutor For Computer Calculus Using Mathematica 2"
          available in English (Prentice-Hall Canada) and Japanese
          (Prentice-Hall Japan).  It is primarily a self-instructional
          companion to a computer-assisted first university calculus course
          but can serve also as a quick introduction to Mathematica while
          reviewing calculus. Our intention is that the student will use any
          designated course text as primary reference and this Self-Tutor in
          two ways:

          1. As an initial prop to gain confidence quickly in using the
          computer as a study aid for new concepts in mathematics by
          exploiting graphics effectively 


          2. Later as a source of ideas for exploring the theory and 

          examples in their calculus courses and in all subsequent studies
          that use mathematics.

          0011:  SelfTutor1.ma Mathematica notebook (April 1994; 983
                 kilobytes)


0206-604: MovieDigitizer: A MathLink Program for Automatic Digitizing of
          QuickTime Movies (April 27, 1994)
          Author: Chikara Miyaji
          MovieDigitizer is a MathLink program that runs on the Macintosh. 

          It reads QuickTime movie files, and communicates the graphical
          information to Mathematica.  From within Mathematica, mouse click
          positions on the movie are accessible as well as the RGB values of
          selected movie areas.  Movie frame control is also available from
          Mathematica. These functions are used in a program for movie image
          processing, automatic digitizing, and tracing.  Reprinted from the
          1994 Mathematica Developers Conference, Champaign, Illinois.

          0011:  Documentation.ma Documentation notebook for program (April
                 1994; 249 kilobytes)

          0022:  Presentation.ma Presentation notebook from Developer
                 Conference presentation (April 1994; 229 kilobytes)

          0033:  MLDlg.c C source-code file (April 1994; 5 kilobytes)

          0044:  MovieDigitizer.c C source-code file (April 1994; 8
                 kilobytes)

          0055:  MovieDigitizer.h C header file (April 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0066:  MovieDigitizer.tm Mathlink template file (April 1994; 3
                 kilobytes)

          0077:  MovieDigitizer.tm.c C source-code file (April 1994; 12
                 kilobytes)

          0088:  Local_mprep.hqx Binhexed Macintosh-specific file (April
                 1994; 64 kilobytes)

          0099:  MovieDigitizer.hqx Binhexed MovieDigitizer program for
                 Macintosh (April 1994; 143 kilobytes)

          0101:  MovieDigitizer.prj.hqx Binhexed project file for Macintosh
                 (April 1994; 460 kilobytes)

          0112:  MovieDigitizer.prj.rsrc.hqx Binhexed resource file for
                 Macintosh (April 1994; 11 kilobytes)


0206-637: Stochastic Fibre Networks (April 27, 1994)
          Author: C.T.J. Dodson
          This notebook arose from research on the statistical geometry of
          stochastic fibre networks. Quite a lot of theory exists for the
          purely random case, based on a Poisson process, but little has 

          been done for the non-random case when the fibres aggregate.  Here
          we use CRAY-generated aggregation data and animate a sequence of
          networks passing through random dispersed and aggregated phases.
          The work on aggregation has applications in many industrial
          processes, for a discussion of the modelling of paper see the book
          by M. Deng and C.T.J. Dodson, "Paper: An Engineered Stochastic
          Structure" Tappi Press, Atlanta 1994.  Reprinted from 1994
          Mathematica Developers Conference, Champaign, Illinois.

          0011:  StochsticFibres.ma Mathematica notebook (April 1994; 4765
                 kilobytes)

          0022:  Localarealdensity.c External C program (April 1994; 7
                 kilobytes)

          0033:  Localarealdensity.tm Template file for Localarealdensity.c
                 (April 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0044:  datafile Text file containing the name of data files (April
                 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0055:  FlocculatedStructure.dat Data file of the coordinates of
                 fibre centers for the flloculated fibre network (April 

                 1994; 93 kilobytes)

          0066:  RandomStructure.dat Data file of the coordinates of fibre
                 centers for the random fibre network (April 1994; 93
                 kilobytes)

          0077:  DispersedStructure.dat Data file of the coordinates of 

                 fibre centers for the dispersed fibre network (April 1994;
                 93 kilobytes)


0206-648: Movies of Molecular Model Vibrations (May 10, 1994)
          Author: W. Martin McClain
          Normal modes of molecular vibration lie at the heart of
          understanding the absorption of infrared light by molecules. These 

          notebooks were developed to accompany an undergraduate laboratory
          experiment.  Students spend one week using the infrared
          spectrometer, and two weeks understanding the theory, as presented
          in the notebooks.  The molecular model is a spring-and-ball model,
          and it uses only Hooke's Law for the springs and Newton's Third 

          Law for the balls.  The problem is transformed to an eigenproblem,
          solved, and the solution is transformed back to the 

          spring-and-ball space.  It is then easy to produce a movie of the
          molecular motion, starting from any desired initial conditions.  

          We show pseudorotation of a ring molecule, a motion that cannot be
          foreseen intuitively. 1994 Mathematica Developer Conference,
          Champaign, Illinois.

          0011:  1-TriangleNormalModes.ma Mathematica notebook (April 29,
                 1994; 225 kilobytes)

          0022:  2-TriangleMovies.ma Mathematica notebook (April 29, 1994; 

                 61 kilobytes)


0206-659: Hershey Text in Mathematica Graphics (April 20, 1994)
          Authors: Roland Jakschewitz
          Using the well-known public domain Hershey font descriptions, it 

          is easy to produce machine-independent, scalable graphics text at
          user-specifiable angles---on screen as well as in print. This 2D
          text can then be projected onto various Mathematica Graphics3D
          surfaces.  One advantage of using Mathematica is that about 20
          lines of Mathematica code have the same functionality as about 20
          pages of C code provided with the font descriptions. Reprinted 

          from the Mathematica Developer Conference, Champaign, Illinois,
          April 1994.

          0011:  Presentation.ma Developer Conference presentation
                 Mathematica notebook (April 1994; 481 kilobytes)

          0022:  hglyph.m Font glyph file in Mathematica format (April 1994;
                 440 kilobytes)

          0033:  hfonts0.m Font index file in Mathematica format (April 

                 1994; 3 kilobytes)

          0044:  hfonts1.m Font index file in Mathematica format (April 

                 1994; 3 kilobytes)


0206-671: Tutorial: Notebooks for Integrated Applications (April 1994)
          Author: John M. Novak
          This notebook discusses the Wolfram Research design guildelines 

          for packages and notebooks.  Topics include: criteria of good
          package design, tips for avoiding common mistakes and problems in
          package design, and converting notebooks to different platforms.
          Reprinted from the Mathematica Developer Conference, Champaign,
          Illinois, April 1994.

          0011:  NotebooksTutorial.ma Mathematica notebook (April 1994; 34
                 kilobytes)


0206-682: Tutorial: Mathematica's Programming Language (April 1994)
          Author: Roman E. Maeder
          Mathematica includes a rich and powerful programming language.  It
          combines the procedural, functional, and rule-based programming
          styles in a single coherent system.  The language is well suited 

          to handle the major programming paradigms, including procedural 

          and functional programming, modularization, abstract data types,
          term rewriting, logic programming, and object-oriented 

          programming.  This documents discusses the typical uses of these
          paradigms and implementation issues for those that are not already
          part of the language.  Reprinted from the Mathematica Developer
          Conference, Champaign, Illinois, April 1994.

          0011:  ProgrammingTutorial.ma Mathematica notebook (April 1994; 48
                 kilobytes)


0206-693: Tutorial: Calling External Programs from Mathematica via MathLink
          (April 1994)
          Author: Todd Gayley
          MathLink is a library of functions that implement a protocol for
          sending and receiving Mathematica expressions. Its uses fall into
          two general categories. The easiest and most common application is
          to allow external functions written in other languages to be 

          called from within the Mathematica environment. If you have an
          algorithm that needs to be implemented in a compiled language for
          efficiency reasons, or if you have code that you don't want to
          rewrite in Mathematica, it is a relatively simple matter to
          incorporate the routines into Mathematica. This use of MathLink is
          the subject of this tutorial.  Reprinted from the Mathematica
          Developer Conference, Champaign, Illinois, April 1994.

          0011:  MathLinkTutorial.ma Mathematica notebook (April 1994; 58
                 kilobytes)


0206-705: HYP - A Package for Handling Hypergeometric Series (May 16, 1994)
          Author: Christian Krattenthaler
          The package HYP allows the handling of binomial and hypergeometric
          series. It provides tools for manipulating factorial expressions,
          transforming binomial sums into hypergeometric notation, summing 

          hypergeometric series, transforming  hypergeometric series,
          applying contiguous relations, doing formal limits of
          hypergeometric expressions, transforming  hypergeometric
          Mathematica expressions into TeX-code, and applying Gosper's and
          Zeilberger's algorithms.

          0011:  README.txt Installation instructions for HYP and HYPQ (May
                 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0022:  hypm.ps PostScript documentation for HYP (May 1994; 781
                 kilobytes)

          0033:  hyp.m Mathematica package defines basic objects and
                 predefines all other objects (May 1994; 147 kilobytes)

          0044:  contig.m Contiguous relations (May 1994; 76 kilobytes)

          0055:  summatio.m Hypergeometric summation formulas as replacement
                 rules (May 1994; 20 kilobytes)

          0066:  summatio.mgl Hypergeometric summation formulas as equations
                 (May 1994; 12 kilobytes)

          0077:  transfor.m Hypergeometric transformation formulas as
                 replacement rules (May 1994; 66 kilobytes)

          0088:  transfor.mgl Hypergeometric transformation formulas as
                 equations (May 1994; 64 kilobytes)

          0099:  transfor.mli Lists of possible outcomes under 

                 hypergeometric transformation formulas (May 1994; 26
                 kilobytes)

          0101:  output Mathematica package to modify output form (May 1994;
                 3 kilobytes)

          0112:  hyp-hypq.ps PostScript tutorial for HYP and HYPQ packages
                 (May 1994; 124 kilobytes)


0206-716: HYPQ - A Package for Handling Basic Hypergeometric Series (May 16,
          1994)
          Author: Christian Krattenthaler
          The package HYPQ allows the handling of q-binomial and basic
          hypergeometric series. It provides tools for manipulating
          q-factorial expressions, transforming q-binomial sums into basic
          hypergeometric notation, summing basic hypergeometric series,
          transforming basic hypergeometric series, applying contiguous
          relations, doing formal limits of basic hypergeometric 

          expressions, and transforming basic hypergeometric Mathematica
          expressions into TeX-code.

          0011:  README.txt Installation instructions for HYP and HYPQ
                 packages (May 1994; 1 kilobyte)

          0022:  hypq.ps PostScript documentation for HYPQ package (May 

                 1994; 963 kilobytes)

          0033:  hyp.q Mathematica package defines basic objects and
                 predefines all other objects (May 1994; 178 kilobytes)

          0044:  contig.q Mathematica package for contiguous relations (May
                 1994; 92 kilobytes)

          0055:  summatio.q Basic hypergeometric summation formulas as
                 replacement rules (May 1994; 43 kilobytes)

          0066:  summatio.qgl Basic hypergeometric summation formulas as
                 equations (May 1994; 18 kilobytes)

          0077:  transfor.q Basic hypergeometric transformation formulas as
                 replacement rules (May 1994; 108 kilobytes)

          0088:  transfor.qgl Basic hypergeometric transformation formulas 

                 as equations (May 1994; 101 kilobytes)

          0099:  transfor.qli Possible outcomes under basic hypergeometric
                 transformation formulas (May 1994; 32 kilobytes)

          0101:  output Mathematica package to modify output form (May 1994;
                 3 kilobytes)

          0112:  hyp-hypq.ps PostScript tutorial for HYP and HYPQ packages
                 (May 1994; 124 kilobytes)


0206-727: Mohr's Circle and Principal Stresses in Two-dimensional Stress
          Analysis (May 17, 1994)
          Author: Levent Kitis
          PrincipalStress plots Mohr's circle of stress for a given state of
          biaxial stress, shows the principal stress element orientation 

          with respect to the given stress element, and prints out the
          numerical values of principal stresses, angles defining the
          principal directions, and maximum shear stresses. All output is
          graphical.

          0011:  PrincipalStress.m Mathematica package (May 16, 1994; 8
                 kilobytes)

          0022:  Documentation.txt Usage notes for PrincipalStress.m (May 

                 16, 1994; 2 kilobytes)


0206-738: Approximate Inversion of Laplace Transform (May 17, 1994)
          Authors: Alexander Cheng
          Laplace transform is often applied to linear partial differential
          equations to eliminate the time dimension. The analytical 

          solutions thus obtained need to be inverted to the time domain. 

          This package provides the Mathematica utility for approximate
          inversion of Laplace transform.

          0011:  NLapInv.m Mathematica package (May 1994; 11 kilobytes)

          0022:  NLapInvDemo.m Demonstration file (May 1994; 4 kilobytes)

          0033:  README.txt Authors notes (May 1994; 1 kilobyte)


0206-749: The Mathematica Journal Vol. 3, No. 4 -- Electronic Supplement 

          (May 17, 1994)
          Authors: Troels Petersen and Editor
          This is the electronic supplement for The Mathematica Journal, 

          Vol. 3, No. 4.  These electronic supplements are available from
          MathSource on a two-issue delay.  That is, when Vol. 1, No. 3 is
          published, Vol. 1, No. 1 is placed on MathSource.  For more
          information regarding the contents of this supplement, see the
          Contents files.

          0011:  Contents.ma Table of Contents -- Mathematica notebook
                 (September, 1993; 12 kilobytes)

          0022:  Contents.txt Table of Contents -- plain-text (September,
                 1993; 5 kilobytes)

          0033:  TMJ-3.4.tar.Z Compressed Unix tar archive (September, 1993;
                 231 kilobytes)

          0044:  TMJ-3.4.sit.hqx Macintosh binhexed Stuffit archive
                 (September, 1993; 564 kilobytes)

          0055:  TMJ-3.4.zip PK-Zip archive (September, 1993; 330 kilobytes)


0206-750: calcE Documentation Notebooks (May 17, 1994)
          Author: Richard Mercer
          calcE is a collection of Mathematica packages which increase the
          power and ease of use of Mathematica for everyday tasks such as
          two-dimensional graphics, displaying tables of data, and solving
          equations. calcE was developed for use in a teaching laboratory. 

          It allows novices to learn Mathematica quickly and gently with its
          natural and forgiving syntax, and allows experts to work more
          efficiently, often requiring 3 to 10 times fewer characters for 

          the creation of complex graphics.

          These notebooks comprise the documentation for the calcE 

          materials.  Demo versions of the materials are available under
          items 0204-691 and 0206-435.

          0011:  CalcEDoc.ma Contains general information about calcE and
                 documentaion for the user features of InitE (May 1994; 38
                 kilobytes)

          0022:  MathEDoc.ma Contains documentation and examples for the
                 package MathE.m (May 1994; 73 kilobytes)

          0033:  PlotEDocI.ma Contains documentation and examples for the
                 package PlotE.m (May 1994; 449 kilobytes)

          0044:  PlotEDocII.ma Contains documentatio and examples for
                 geometric objects in the package PlotE.m (May 1994; 570
                 kilobytes)

          0055:  TeachEDoc.ma Contains documentation and examples for the
                 packages TeachE.m and Plot3DE.m (May 1994; 1181 kilobytes)


0206-761: Tutorial:  Package Design (April 1994)
          Author: Todd Gayley
          Good design is the most important criterion for creating packages
          for distribution. It is easy to become immersed in the specifics 

          of implementing the functions; however, it is the design that
          manifests itself to the user, not the implementation details. Even
          the cleverest, fastest code can be made useless if it is clumsily
          packaged. The time and thought invested in design considerations
          will be well rewarded in increased usability, easier maintenance,
          and a shortened development cycle.  Reprinted from the Mathematica
          Developer Conference, Champaign, Illinois, April 1994.

          0011:  PackageDesignTutorial.ma Mathematica notebook (April 1994;
                 33 kilobytes)

=============================================================





  • Prev by Date: 1994 European Mathematica Conference for advanced Users
  • Next by Date: quadratic/linear programming
  • Previous by thread: Mathematica Workshops in Washington, D.C. and Boston, MA
  • Next by thread: quadratic/linear programming