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MathGroup Archive 1995

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Re: Advice on "MMA for Scientists and Engineers" Book

  • To: mathgroup at christensen.cybernetics.net
  • Subject: [mg2047] Re: [mg2006] Advice on "MMA for Scientists and Engineers" Book
  • From: Richard Mercer <richard at seuss.math.wright.edu>
  • Date: Sat, 16 Sep 1995 01:43:17 -0400

>  I have recently purchased a copy of Mathematica and a
>  simple book to learn the system. Now I am looking for a
>  book more oriented to the use of Mathematica for
>  engineering analysis. I looked at the Wolfram Research
>  WWW page and read the description for "Mathematica for
>  Scientists and Engineers" by Thomas Bahder, and I would
>  like to get some opinions from others who have it as to
>  whether it is worth $46.21 (Addison-Wesley's list price).
>  If a thread on this book has already happened, I apologize
>  for bringing it up again. Postings here or private Email
>  would be fine.  Thanks.
>  

>  

>  Andy Sylvester    Aerospace Engineer
>  asylvest at gp401.jsc.nasa.gov

Bahder's book emphasizes the use of Mathematica as applied to topics in typical  
Engineering Math courses, i.e. calculus, differential equations, numerical  
methods, matrix algebra, etc. For an engineering student, or an engineering who  
wants to use Mathematica on the math they took in college, this will get you up  
to speed faster than any other book I've seen. (I haven't seen them all!)
It's about doing Applied Math in Mathematica, not about Engineering per se, and  
it's a better resource book than a text.

Richard Mercer

P.S. Very few computer books are worth their list price. I would not be excited  
about paying $46 for this one, especially in soft cover. I guess the price  
reflects the restricted market, like most textbooks.


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