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MathGroup Archive 1998

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Re: Re: PDEs & Mathematica.

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  • Subject: [mg10734] Re: [mg10700] Re: [mg10642] PDEs & Mathematica.
  • From: Richard Gass <>
  • Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 00:44:27 -0500
  • References: <>

>William Golz wrote:
>> The "online book" does not describe how to plug in initial and boundary
>> conditions for a PDE; and when I try to do it ODE style, which is
>> explained I get error messages. If anyone knows the proper syntax for
>> solving PDEs with boundary conditions, I would appreciate some advice.
>> I would also appreciate any information on good books dealing with PDEs
>> and Mathematica.
>> ____________
>> William Golz
>> Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Louisiana State
>> University
>> Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803
>> E-mail:
>> Phone:  (318)237-8353
Sean Ross wrote
>The DSolve and NDSolve do not contain routines for partial differential
>equations.  I am not aware of any other built-in functions that have
>routines for partial differential equations. --

 Actually NDSolve can solve 1+1 (one space and one time) dimensional
PDEs if they are Cauchy initial value problems. DSolve will solve so
PDEs although I have never gotten it to solve a PDE I cared about.
Examples of using NDSolve of PDEs and intial value problems can be
found in my book Mathematica for Scientists and Engineers , Prentice
Hall 1998. A short exsample is given below

S=Pi r^2;

FluidEquation=(1/S)D[S D[\[Psi][x,t],x],x]-(1/c^2)D[\[Psi][x,t],{t,2}]



  PlotLabel->"density plot of the  excess pressure"];

This example will take a fair bit of memory.

Richard Gass
Department of Physics
University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, OH 45221
phone- 513-556-0519

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