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MathGroup Archive 2000

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Re: transposing an equation

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg26294] Re: transposing an equation
  • From: leko at ix.netcom.com (J. Leko)
  • Date: Sun, 10 Dec 2000 00:20:04 -0500 (EST)
  • References: <90kq3d$r25@smc.vnet.net>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

You could do this:

In[2]:= Solve[y == a x^2 + b x + c, x]
Out[2]=
\!\({{x -> \(\(-b\) + \ at \(b\^2 - 4\ a\ c + 4\ a\ y\)\)\/\(2\ a\)}, {x -> \
\(-\(\(b + \ at \(b\^2 - 4\ a\ c + 4\ a\ y\)\)\/\(2\ a\)\)\)}}\)

(sorry about the formating). Although in this case, you get something
similar to the quadratic equation for answers, so there are really no A,
B, and C's.


In article <90kq3d$r25 at smc.vnet.net>, "Christopher Deacon"
<cdeacon at physics.mun.ca> wrote:

> Suppose y=a x^2+b x +c.
> 
> How can I get Mathematica to solve for x (i.e., x=Ay^2+By+C) and give me the
> values for the constants A,B,C?
> 
> Chris
> 
> --
> +-----------------------------+----------------------------+
> |       Christopher Deacon    |         (709) 737-7631
> | Dept of Physics and Physical|   cdeacon at physics.mun.ca
> |         Oceanography
> | Memorial University of Nfld
> +----------------------------+-----------------------------+
> |                http://www.physics.mun.ca/~cdeacon
> +----------------------------------------------------------+

J. Leko

Please e-mail replies to leko*j at cspar.uah.edu and remove the *


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