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MathGroup Archive 2000

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Re: Associated Legendre Definition

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg25672] Re: Associated Legendre Definition
  • From: Preben Bohn <pmib at my-deja.com>
  • Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 02:52:39 -0400 (EDT)
  • References: <8se9qf$6q3@smc.vnet.net>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

Sorry for that question. It seems that the normalization does not
matter. Of course it does matter if you have got some coefficient you
should use (which I unfortunately had) and you don't know the
normalization used.

Best regards

Preben Bohn

In article <8se9qf$6q3 at smc.vnet.net>,
  Preben Bohn <pmib at my-deja.com> wrote:
> In Mathematica, the associated Legendre polynomial is defined as
>
> P(n,m,x) = (-1)^m (1-x^2)^(m/2) d^m/dx^m (P(n,x))
>
> while in Schaum's Outlines 'Mathematical Handbook of Formulas and
> tables' it is defined as
>
> P(n,m,x) = (1-x^2)^(m/2) d^m/dx^m (P(n,x))
>
> What is true (or doesn't it matter)?
>
> Best regards
>
> Preben Bohn
>
> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.
>
>


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.


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