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MathGroup Archive 2005

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Re: "Leibnitz" from for partial differentiation?

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg61216] Re: "Leibnitz" from for partial differentiation?
  • From: "Jens-Peer Kuska" <kuska at informatik.uni-leipzig.de>
  • Date: Thu, 13 Oct 2005 01:39:27 -0400 (EDT)
  • Organization: Uni Leipzig
  • References: <dii958$9fk$1@smc.vnet.net>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

Hi,

The partial derivative is

\!\(\[PartialD]\_x u[x, t]\)

in input, but Mathematica will always use 
Derivative[1,0][u][x,t]

for it until you redifine the standard output.

The total derivative is always expressed by 
partial

derivatives.

Regards

  Jens

"Steven T. Hatton" <hattons at globalsymmetry.com> 
schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
news:dii958$9fk$1 at smc.vnet.net...
| Much of the literature I'm looking at uses 
partial derivative notation
| expressed by FractionBox["\[PartialD]", 
RowBox[{"\[PartialD]", "x"}]].
| Likewise for the total derivative. d/dt.  IIRC, 
there is a Mathematica
| notational form which displays and perhaps 
accepts this form of derivative
| notaton.  ?*Form gave me several hits, but none 
that I've tried so far seem
| to be working.  Does anybody know which 
notational form to use for this?
| Is it in a package?
| -- 
| "Philosophy is written in this grand book, The 
Universe. ... But the book
| cannot be understood unless one first learns to 
comprehend the language...
| in which it is written. It is written in the 
language of mathematics, ...;
| without which wanders about in a dark 
labyrinth."   The Lion of Gaul
| 



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