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Re: Display Math Formula

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg92436] Re: Display Math Formula
  • From: John <jwa0 at lehigh.edu>
  • Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2008 21:52:33 -0400 (EDT)
  • References: <gbqcqv$e6r$1@smc.vnet.net> <gbt2vg$lho$1@smc.vnet.net>

On Sep 30, 7:36 am, Albert Retey <a... at gmx-topmail.de> wrote:
> John wrote:
> > Mathematica 6 Notebook
>
> > A pallette version of the formula is available if needed.
>
> > The formula must be print when the notebook is formatted, but nothing
> > that I have tried works.
>
> > The evaluation executes, but there is a empty box, tinted red, where
> > the formula should appear.
>
> Unfortunatly it needs some wild guessing when trying to understand what
> you try to achieve, so the follwing might be off topic. Probably
> ExpressionCell is what you are looking for, e.g.:
>
> ExpressionCell[(x + 1)^a/(1 + y)^2]
>
> > Am I right to expect that Cell[????....?] will do the job, if the ?s
> > are replaced with correct code?
>
> Cell is the low level version, which needs some extra effort to create a
> correctly formatted cell in the notebook. This would be one way to
> create a cell with a formatted formula within it:
>
> CellPrint[Cell[BoxData[ToBoxes[(x + 1)^a/(1 + y)^2]], "Output"]]
>
> hth,
>
> albert

Albert,

Thank you for your helpful advice.

CellPrint[Cell[BoxData[ToBoxes[inserted the pallett version of
formula]],"Output"]]

The word null is printed in the spot where the printed formula should
appear.

I prefer to use the pallett because it is easy to create a complicated
formula.

John



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