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Re: Using Mathematica notebooks in presentations?

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg97611] Re: Using Mathematica notebooks in presentations?
  • From: Jens-Peer Kuska <kuska at informatik.uni-leipzig.de>
  • Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2009 04:57:22 -0500 (EST)
  • Organization: Uni Leipzig
  • References: <gpl5t7$ouo$1@smc.vnet.net>
  • Reply-to: kuska at informatik.uni-leipzig.de

Hi,

it is very clever to ignore Mathematicas
"Slide Show" mode and to ask
"How to include Mathematica without using Mathematica"

If you want to have interactive Mathematica
elements in your presentation
*use* Mathematica slide shows, if you want no Mathematica
use PowerPoint, Keynote or Acrobat.

Regards
   Jens

AES wrote:
> Graphics material prepared in Mathematica (figures, charts, graphs, 
> tables, animations, movies, demonstrations) can for the most part be 
> exported to external files, which can then be inserted into or used in 
> documents or presentations prepared in PDF, PPT, or other widely used 
> formats using Acrobat, Word, PowerPoint, Preview, Keynote, QuickTime, 
> and innumerable other editing and presentation tools.  
> 
> In general tools like these (the presentation tools in particular) allow 
> for either _embedding_ these materials within the presentation itself, 
> or for _linking_ to these materials as separate free-standing (and hence 
> separately updatable or replaceable) files, which are in some cases then 
> actually displayed by their parent app, which is temporarily activated 
> within the presentation itself.
> 
> [Adobe Acrobat, Adobe Reader, and PowerPoint can, for example, link to 
> and activate QuickTime movies and certain other apps from within 
> presentations that they are presenting.]
> 
> A quick experiment shows that PDF files in particular can also contain 
> links to Mathematica notebooks, such that one can open and view or 
> display notebooks within a PDF document or presentation that one is 
> viewing or displaying using Acrobat (or, I suspect, Adobe Reader); and 
> then revert back to or continue with the PDF presentation itself.  
> 
> [PDF files seem to have the general capability in fact to link to, open, 
> and let you execute most any kind of external file whose parent app is 
> also present on your system.]
> 
> Per a recent thread in this group, Mathematica notebooks can also be 
> made auto-starting or auto-executing, such that they can begin executing 
> immediately when linked to from within a PDF document.  
> 
> I've yet to explore whether Mathematica-linking capabilities similar to 
> the above are also available in PowerPoint, Keynote, or other widely 
> used presentation programs (though programs like these can certainly 
> link to and execute QuickTime movies and other dynamic media); and I've 
> also yet to explore whether these links to notebooks from within PDF 
> presentations can be made to display within a specific window within the 
> underlying basic presentation (although this is also certainly possible 
> with certain combinations of presentation apps and other external 
> files). 
> 
> Because of its potential usefulness, I'd appreciate seeing posts from 
> anyone else who has experience with this overall mode of operation -- 
> that is, with linking to notebooks (or any other Mathematica formats) 
> from _within_ other varieties of presentation software -- and who can 
> add further helpful hints, tricks, or pointers to tutorial material.
> 
> [Debates on _whether_ one _should_ present Mathematica-generated 
> material in this fashion -- that is, by starting with other presentation 
> applications and linking from within them to Mathematica notebooks -- 
> are a separate topic, and might be be the subject of a separate thread.]
> 


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