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Re: Artistic impression of cloudy structures

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg121699] Re: Artistic impression of cloudy structures
  • From: BernieTheJet <berniethejet at gmail.com>
  • Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2011 04:15:44 -0400 (EDT)
  • Delivered-to: l-mathgroup@mail-archive0.wolfram.com
  • References: <j5mmfc$rqu$1@smc.vnet.net>

On Sep 25, 3:50 am, Dimitris Emmanoulopoulos
<demmanoulopou... at hotmail.com> wrote:
> Thanks a lot Roger for your time.
> Unfortunately the cloudy structure is still 2D. My problem is not how to 
insert a 2D plot in a 3D graphics (as you showed very nicely) but rather how I construct mathematically an actual 3D structure that looks like a cloud.
> Is there any algorithm producing a distribution of points (x,y,z) (maybe based on a random number generator) or a continuous surface f(x),f(y),f(z) resembling that of a cloud e.g.http://www.google.com/imgres?q=weather+clouds&num=10&um=1&hl=en&clien...
>
> Thanks a lot,
> Dimitris

You could try ContourPlot3D of, say, 3 contours of the distributions
of a small number of 3D points, as generated by a nonparametric
density estimator, which I believe is built in now to Mathematica 8.  You
could put a low opacity on each surface to give it some sense of
impermanence.

B




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