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Re: Using Mathematica to create slides

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg124203] Re: Using Mathematica to create slides
  • From: Alexei Boulbitch <Alexei.Boulbitch at iee.lu>
  • Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2012 04:52:12 -0500 (EST)
  • Delivered-to: l-mathgroup@mail-archive0.wolfram.com

Hi,

- How can I hide the Input cells with the Mathematica source code in

them?



I use 3 ways of hiding Input cells:



1.       You can simply collapse the input-output cell group around the output cell.



2.       You can mark the left bracket of the Input cell, then go to Menu/Cell/Cell Properties and uncheck "Open".  The cell will become invisible except for a small bracket at the right of the screen. It would be a good idea to mark it in addition as the "Initialization Cell" (Menu/Cell/Cell Properties/InitializationCell) and initialize all such cells right before the presentation by execution any operation.



3.       You can have evaluated all your operators in a separate notebook. The presentation notebook will not have the whole code, but only the names of the main expressions of your code. Then in the presentation notebook one only needs to evaluate these expression names.  You may treat the expression names in several ways.



a)      You may, for example, like to choose to give these names a form of titles yielding a one-word name of what is demonstrated below in the output cell.  Then you do not need to hide such a name. You even may want to highlight this name by choosing its font, color and background.



b)      Alternatively you may what to make them invisible, but still to have a full control over them (e.g. to be able to immediately execute the expression during your talk upon the necessity). Then you can plainly write such a name down in the Input cell, then mark it and change its color into White: Menu/Format/Text Color/White.



c)       You may also use one of the approaches 1 or 2.





Each of these approaches has its advantages and disadvantages. You should try and depending upon your code and aim choose one or a combination of them.



   - Can I have a cell that doesn't stretch all the way across the slide

horizontally?  So that I can have some text and an example by the side

of it?

You may define the cell dimensions, but to group material I rather use Row[ ] , or in more general cases Grid[ ]. Then you do not need to think how long is your cell. You can also try to wrap the Row or Grid by Panel[ ].



- Can I have a cell that doesn't appear when the slide is first shown,

but which appears when the advance button is pressed?  Something like

the multistage animations in PowerPoint?



It is not quite clear to me, what do you want to achieve. Mathematica has many ways to do something like this.



1.       On one hand, there is a possibility to Open/Close groups of cells. Like this you may keep a cell or a whole group of cells closed until you need them.



2.       Another ways are represented by the FlipView[ ] and TabView[ ] functions. Just check the corresponding Help pages. They can be wrapped around any other set of functions, so that you may get a wide variety of results. In particular, if you want that first there is nothing visible on the screen, and then some images or interactive toys appear, you may choose the following. Use the FlipView[{image1, image2,toy1,toy2}] and let image 1 be simply a white square with a white boundary, while image 2, toy1 and toy2 and all the rest (if any) will already be something visible.



3.       You also may create a notebook with a necessary cell upon pressing a button. For example below you make a button that calls a notebook showing a picture. Evaluate this in Mathematica:



rose = Import[

   "ExampleData/rose.gif"];   (* This only defines an image *)



(* This makes the button  *)

Button["Show rose",

 nb = CreateDocument[rose, WindowSize -> {150, 150},

   NotebookFileName -> "rose", Background -> RGBColor[1, .9, .7]]]



Have fun, Alexei



Alexei BOULBITCH, Dr., habil.

IEE S.A.

ZAE Weiergewan,

11, rue Edmond Reuter,

L-5326 Contern, LUXEMBOURG



Office phone :  +352-2454-2566

Office fax:       +352-2454-3566

mobile phone:  +49 151 52 40 66 44



e-mail: alexei.boulbitch at iee.lu<mailto:alexei.boulbitch at iee.lu>



Hi,



I'm thinking of using Mathematica to create some slides for a

presentation on 3D graphics algorithms.  I've found a lot of neat ways

of creating examples but I'm having a bit of trouble seeing how to lay

out the slides.  In particular



- How can I hide the Input cells with the Mathematica source code in

them?



- Can I have a cell that doesn't stretch all the way across the slide

horizontally?  So that I can have some text and an example by the side

of it?



- Can I have a cell that doesn't appear when the slide is first shown,

but which appears when the advance button is pressed?  Something like

the multistage animations in PowerPoint?



- Can I have any transition between slides other than a jump?



I'd be really grateful for any help with these.  Thanks in advance.






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