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MathGroup Archive 2004

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Re: a strange line of code

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg52716] Re: [mg52710] a strange line of code
  • From: Tomas Garza <tgarza01 at prodigy.net.mx>
  • Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2004 05:21:09 -0500 (EST)
  • References: <200412100124.UAA18993@smc.vnet.net>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

These are essential symbols in functional programming, which you must learn 
in order to take full advantage of Mathematica. The example you are using is 
written in functional programming. You'll have to start from scratch, I'm 
afraid. There is no shortcut.

Tomas Garza
Mexico City
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Stefan Schuster" 
To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
<bi1169*delete_from_star_to_star* at fh-weihenstephan.de>
Subject: [mg52716] [mg52710] a strange line of code


> Hello,
>
> in a notebook, I found and function to calculate the Feigenbaum
> bifurcation Diagram.
> I principial understand the Feigenbaum, and I think I'm also able to
> write such an funcion by myself, but not in this compact way.
>
> Can someone please explain me the meaning of the Symbols #, @ and &
>
> Here is the Code:
>
> Feigenbaum = Compile[{{
>     ?, _Real}}, ({?, #} &) /@ Union[Drop[NestList[
>       ? # (1 - #) &, 0.2, 300], 100]]];
>
> thanks in advance
>
> Stefan
>
> 



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