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MathGroup Archive 2005

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Re: Types in Mathematica

  • To: mathgroup at smc.vnet.net
  • Subject: [mg62218] Re: Types in Mathematica
  • From: David Bailey <dave at Remove_Thisdbailey.co.uk>
  • Date: Wed, 16 Nov 2005 02:28:21 -0500 (EST)
  • References: <200511120833.DAA19252@smc.vnet.net> <43762529.7060603@math.umass.edu> <dl8s4g$n41$1@smc.vnet.net> <dl980q$r2a$1@smc.vnet.net> <200511140805.DAA00041@smc.vnet.net> <dlc96b$m81$1@smc.vnet.net>
  • Sender: owner-wri-mathgroup at wolfram.com

I agree with Andrzej that that the hybrid nature of the Mathematica 
language is a great strength. It offers programmers (not all of whom are 
expert with Mathematica) a fall-back way to implement operations that 
they can't see how to do in a functional way. Often the loss of 
efficiency is not relevant in their application.

Furthermore, when you use a language that follow a single paradigm (e.g. 
Java) there are always ideas that don't fit the paradigm and end up 
being implemented in a clumsy, confusing way - e.g. Java event 
processing (IMHO).

David Bailey
http://www.dbaileyconsultancy.co.uk


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